Tag Archives: way back craft

Way Back Craft: Knitting Bag

The friend’s daughter that I made this for is a teenager now, so wow, it’s been a while! I’ve made several of these bags since, but have never created a pattern. It’s my favorite go-to tote bag style!

I have no idea if she still enjoys knitting. I’ll have to ask her mom!

original post, September 30, 2007:

Hot off the sewing machine for my friend’s daughter! She’ll be 11 next month and is a brand new knitter. She told her mom she’d like a knitting bag and I jumped on the chance to make something special for her.

I didn’t have a pattern, just dimensions and sketches I did before starting my project.

Made with denim for the outside. The purple fabric is something I had in my stash.  I’m not sure what it’s made of, but it’s pretty heavy and feels like it could be upholstery fabric. I used some unattractive corduroy in place of interfacing.

The straps are made as one continuous piece, like a big loop. They hold the pocket down. The pocket was sewn top and bottom, right sides together then turned. It goes all the way around, but I sewed stop lines just above the fold line for the bottom.  2 pockets on the inside, too.

I’m really pleased with the finish product. I may have to make another one!

I made the buttons for her too. They’re various manga characters she likes, as well as a personalized and knitting button.

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Way Back Craft: Snape Dammit Doll

If you’re not familiar with Dammit Dolls, the idea is this: a basic soft doll with long legs to hold on to, usually accompanied by a poem that goes something like this:

When you want to kick the desk or throw the phone and shout,
Here’s a little dammit doll you cannot do without,
Just grasp it firmly by the legs, and find a place to slam it,
And as you whack it’s stuffing out, yell,
dammit, dammit, dammit!

What? Sometimes a girl has to vent her frustration! Of course, I can’t do that in an ordinary way, it has to have a fandom twist to it.

My original post on Craftster, January 27, 2007:

I’ve been feeling a bit… erm, craftipated, and decided on a simple & fun project that might help me get back on the crafty track.

I’ve seen Snape as a dammit doll before and decided to do one of my own.  I’ve left him with a, shall we say “blank” expression?   (Read: I suck at faces.)

One of my friends has suggested Voldie, Umbridge & the Malfoys as possible future candidates to be  dammit dolled.

Now I need a Snaperific poem to go along with him.

For the pattern, I drew out the shape I wanted then cut the hands, feet & head away from the body, cut those out of muslin and the body out of black adding seam allowance to all the pieces.  I then attached hands, feet & head, then sewed front to back.  I stuffed it & stitched up the hole I’d left for stuffing.  For the hair… I wrapped black yarn around a 6″ ruler, then stitched it down the middle, hand-stitched it to his head then gave it a trim so to achieve those “greasy black curtains” of hair.

I had some issues with the corners (under the arms, neck, etc).  I think it was more the fabric than the pattern.  The black fabric was a little too loosely woven, so the stitching was pulling out.  I think if I used a tighter fabric, I wouldn’t have the same problems.

I’m may make some shoes and a cloak for him, but I haven’t decided yet.  I kind of like him just the way he is.   Grin

ETA: No cloak or shoes, or anything else for that matter, but Dammit Snape still lives in my sewing room. He still makes me smile, even without a Snapetastic Dammit Doll poem.

Happy crafting!

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TTMT #67 – Way Back Crafts

In which I show a couple of new projects, get nostalgic and am interrupted.

If you make a Sew Awesome Craft or any pattern, craft or recipe from sewhooked,  I’d love to see a photo. Email me or add it to the sewhooked flickr group.

Happy crafting!

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Way Back Craft: Name Tees

name t-shirts

Talk about Way Back…I’m slightly embarrassed to say that it’s been almost a year since I posted a Way Back Craft!

Way Back Crafts are crafts I made ages and ages ago.  Usually, they were posted on my very first craft site, Jen’s Crochet and Crafts (1998 – 2006), but they have not been posted to the sewhooked blog or were only posted to sewhooked in a very basic way.

Today’s craft comes to you from around 2001 or 2002.  I made these cute t-shirts for holiday gifts for my nieces, daughter, and several children of my friends (that’s an original, old school pre-digital photo there!).  These were made around the same time t-shirts embellished with “Princess” were really popular.  The shirts were a huge hit with the bonus of being easy and inexpensive to make!

Supplies

  • light colored t-shirt
  • Fabric Paint (Tulip Slick Glitter used in picture)
  • safety pins
  • masking tape
  • polyester glitter (optional)
  • well-lit window or light box
  1. Prepare your t-shirt by washing and drying without fabric softener.
  2. Using your word processing software, print the name you want to paint in a large, bold font. This paper will go inside the shirt as a guideline.
  3. Position the name you printed inside the shirt where you want to paint, securing with a couple of safety pins or masking tape.
  4. Using masking tape, tape the t-shirt to a clean, dry window.  If you are lucky enough to have a light box, use that instead.
  5. Trace the letters with chalk or pencil.
  6. Place a t-shirt form or box (Priority shipping box works well) inside the t-shirt to make it easier to paint.
  7. Trace the text again with the fabric paint. It is important not to touch the tip of the paint to the shirt, which can drag the paint and make it smear. Take your time, as it this can be tedious, but it’s worth it!
  8. When you’re done, find a safe place for your shirt to dry flat 24 hours.
  9. For an iridescent effect, sprinkle iridescent polyester glitter on wet paint before allowing to dry.
  10. Wait 24 hours, then shake off excess glitter.
  11. Wash & dry inside out.

If you make a Sew Awesome Craft or any pattern, craft or recipe from sewhooked,  I’d love to see a photo.  Email me or add it to the sewhooked flickr group.

Happy crafting!

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Way Back Craft: Gryffindor “Canopy”

Elena's "canopy"

Elena’s Gryffindor Canopy, approximately 2002

Well, we’re way past due for a Way Back Craft!

So, you want a Harry Potter bedroom?  The very first thing I think of when I think of Harry’s dormitory, is the four poster bed with house-colored hangings.  Wouldn’t that be fabulous?

It definitely would be.

Unfortunately, not all of us have the means or the space for a four poster bed.

This is the problem I encountered when designing a Harry Potter room for my daughter.  Her room has a ceiling fan and the room is just too small for a four poster bed.  The Gryffindor canopy was on her Must Have list when the room decoration was being planned.   I have the great fortune to have two very DIY parents and the first thing that popped in my head was mounting something lightweight on to the wall.

How about a faux canopy that gives the feeling of those hangings without the actual expense or space requirements of a real four poster?

Then I started thinking price.  Cheap would be good.  Very good.  PVC.  PERFECT!

A fun aside on this project – when I was buying the fabric, the woman at the cutting table at the fabric store asked if I was making a dress.  When I told her I was making a Gryffindor canopy for a Harry Potter bedroom, she stared with her mouth open.  It was the first of many stunned looks directed at my fandom crafting!

Supplies

  • 3 lengths of 1 to 1 1/2” PVC pipe cut into 18” (45.7 cm) pieces (use a hacksaw or have it done at your DIY store)

Note: PVC under 1” is not recommended because it’s too flexible. Make sure the threaded plug & metal flange will work with the pipe you chose. They’re easy to test at the DIY store.

  • 3 threaded plugs
  • 3 metal floor flanges
  • 3 flat PVC caps
  • 3 decorative wood rosette with a flat back
  • Epoxy, Liquid Nails or other cement-like glue
  • Primer spray paint
  • Gold spray paint (Use silver for Slytherin, bronze or silver for Ravenclaw and black for Hufflepuff)
  • Pencil
  • Measuring tape
  • Screwdriver
  • Drill (optional)
  • Screws with anchors
  • 5 1/2 yards (5 meters) of red satiny fabric  (Use green for Slytherin, blue for Ravenclaw or yellow for Huffelpuff)
  • matching thread
  • sewing machine (optional)

Instructions

  1. Prewash fabric then hem on both ends, set aside.
  2. Following manufacturer’s directions, use epoxy to glue the threaded plugs to one end of each of the PVC pipes. On opposite ends of pipes, use epoxy to attach the PVC caps. Epoxy the wooden rosette onto the cap. Allow epoxy to dry. Screw pipe into metal flange. Stand up on it’s end in a well covered, well ventilated area.
  3. Paint with primer. Allow to dry according to manufacturer’s directions. Paint gold. Allow to dry overnight.
  4. Find the center of your bed, mark a light line on the wall. Depending on the width of your bed and where you want the fabric to reach on the sides, you will need to attach the flanges lower or higher.  If you have someone helping you, it’s a good idea to hold the center pipe in place with the fabric, centered, on the pipe. You can then determine how high the center pipe should be and where to place your two side pipes. They can be low or high, depending on your preference.  Use measuring tape to assure the three pipes will be symmetrical.
  5. Attach the metal flanges to the wall using screws and anchors, using the drill for pilot holes if necessary.
  6. Screw pipes into each flange. Arrange canopy fabric.

Makes a great window treatment, too!

Also for your Harry Potter room:  HP Bookcase Mural

p.s. I made the afghan, too.  😉

As always, if you make any pattern or craft from sewhooked,  I’d love to see a photo. Email me or add it to the Friends of sewhooked flickr group.

Happy crafting

also available on The Leaky Cauldron- Crafts

Way Back Craft: Harry Potter Bookcase Mural

HP Closet Mural

It’s hard to believe I’ve never blogged about this project!

Years ago, I had a website called Jen’s Crochet and Crafts.   It eventually morphed into sewhooked.   The Harry Potter Bookcase Mural was originally posted there, along with the story of how it came to be.

When my almost-14-year-old-daughter was about to turn 8, she asked for a Harry Potter-themed room for her birthday.   Being a big HP fan myself, I was as excited as she was to take on the project.  Among her requests were castle walls, an enchanted ceiling, The Fat Lady on her door, red and gold hangings for her bed and a magical bookcase.   I managed all of those things, but the bookcase remains my absolute favorite part of the project.

The original bookcase was drawn freehand with chalk.  I’ve since made a map for use on an overhead projector, or, if you have a steady hand and feel up to it, to use as a free-hand guide.

Supplies:

You need a clean dry surface to start with.  If painting on an older surface, you may want to paint with primer first.

Print the template on clear acetate and project the image onto the selected area.   Position the bookcase where you’d like for it to appear. Use masking tape to outline the area that will become your bookcase.

Use semi-gloss paint and the paint roller to paint the taped-off area.

Paint a second coat if necessary. Allow to dry overnight.

Using a pencil or chalk, trace the bookcase (not the contents), adding a border if needed or desired.  A ruler or yardstick comes in really handy for this step.

Paint bookcase shelves and allow to dry.

Starting with the top shelf, trace contents.

Bottom left - close up
bottom left, close up

After tracing, paint contents using a variety of colors.  An egg carton works great to have multiple colors available at once.

Repeat for all shelves, allow to dry overnight.

Using a variety of permanent markers, add book names using this list of books provided.

vBottom right - close up
bottom right, close up

Randomly place books where you like, except for The Standard Book of Spells. Look for these on the second shelf from the top, on the right side.  The seven books are more or less together, each with a line across the top of the binding (only 6 books are listed in the HP series, but I’m assuming there would have been a seventh if Harry had returned for his final year of school).

Top left - close up
top left, close up

Add embellishments; names on potions bottles, cat whiskers, etc. with permanent markers.

Stand back and admire your work!

More photos from the Harry Potter bedroom with instructions on sewhooked

If you make this or any sewhooked crafts, I’d love to see a photo!  Email me or add it to the Friends of sewhooked flickr group.

Happy Crafting!

Also posted on The Leaky Cauldron and cut out + keep

Faux “Knit” Crochet Hogwarts Scarf

Lumos Craft -Scarf In Progress

add to your ravelry queue

Printable Pattern

In July of 2006, I enjoyed one of the best trips of my life to Las Vegas, Nevada.  My friend Hope and I went to Lumos, the first Harry Potter conference I attended.

I was still fairly new to the online Harry Potter fandom, though I’d been part of the HP world since 1999.   I was a new moderator for Harry Potter Crafts (2006-2008) and was not yet working for The Leaky Cauldron as a Crafty Witch (2006-2007).

Lumos changed everything.  Suddenly, the names of people I knew online had faces, and voices and hugs!

Prior to the conference, I went into a crafting frenzy.  I’m a Ravenclaw, and of course needed a house scarf!  I wanted to my scarf to look knit…but I’m not a knitter.  It’s my daughter’s craft, and I have left it alone because it makes her happy to be able to do a craft that mom doesn’t!

Anyhow, I wanted a knit-look scarf and had played with Tunisian crochet before.  After working out the width of the bars, I went to work.  This is the result.  It’s a narrow scarf because I wore it in Las Vegas…in July.  Can you say HOT?

Faux “Knit” Crochet Hogwarts Scarf

Lumos Craft - Ravenclaw Scarf & Prissy

Scarf as modeled in 2006 by my dearly departed Prissy

  • Uses the Tunisian “knit” stitch:  Tutorial on Stitch Diva and on Crochet Cabana (there are lots more, use the one that works for you)
  • Example made in Red Heart worsted weight – Soft Navy & Carrot (for Ravenclaw)
  • “I” afghan or other long crochet hook (gauge varies by size – work with what you like best)

narrow scarf =ch 15, “movie” size=ch 42

Row 1: ch 15 for a narrow scarf, or 42 for wider “movie” size. Insert the hook into the 2nd ch from hook, yo, and pull loop through the chain stitch (2 loops on hook). *Insert hook into next chain, yo, and pull loop through ch*, rep *to* to end of row, leaving all loops on the hook. The number of loops on the the hook should be the same as the beginning foundation chain. Do not turn.

Row 2: Working from left to right, yo and pull through first loop on hook, *yo, and pull through next 2 loops*, rep *to* to end of row (1 loop left on hook).

Row 3: *Insert hook between the 2 double vertical strands of each loop (from front to back), below the chain formed by row 2, yo and pull through a loop (loosely)*, rep *to* across row.

Row 4: Repeat row 2

Repeat row 3 & 4 for pattern. When changing color, attach at end of even row at “1 loop left” so that the remaining loop is the new color. You can easily count the rows you’ve made by the ridges on the back of your work – each ridge equals 2 rows.

*1- 28 in MC 29 (14 ridges)

32 in CC (2 ridges)

33 – 38 in MC (3 ridges)

39-42 in CC (2 ridges)

43- 66 in MC (14 ridges)

Repeat 13 times. You should have 14 sets of “captured” bars and each end should be 28 rows long. Fold the entire scarf in half and whip stitch. The seam can be in the back or on a side – your choice. Whip stitch the ends closed and add short fringe all the way across.

*some resources describe Tunisian crochet with each ridge, or every two rows as one row. If you want to count like that, then think 1-14, 15-16, etc. when counting.

Add your Sewhooked-related photos to my flickr group and you might be featured in a future post!

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This is part of my “Way Back Craft” series; patterns, crafts, tutorials and general crafty memories before the days of this craft blog.

This pattern is also available on The Leaky Cauldron.