Category Archives: way back craft

Way Back Craft: Gryffindor “Canopy”

Elena's "canopy"

Elena’s Gryffindor Canopy, approximately 2002

Well, we’re way past due for a Way Back Craft!

So, you want a Harry Potter bedroom?  The very first thing I think of when I think of Harry’s dormitory, is the four poster bed with house-colored hangings.  Wouldn’t that be fabulous?

It definitely would be.

Unfortunately, not all of us have the means or the space for a four poster bed.

This is the problem I encountered when designing a Harry Potter room for my daughter.  Her room has a ceiling fan and the room is just too small for a four poster bed.  The Gryffindor canopy was on her Must Have list when the room decoration was being planned.   I have the great fortune to have two very DIY parents and the first thing that popped in my head was mounting something lightweight on to the wall.

How about a faux canopy that gives the feeling of those hangings without the actual expense or space requirements of a real four poster?

Then I started thinking price.  Cheap would be good.  Very good.  PVC.  PERFECT!

A fun aside on this project – when I was buying the fabric, the woman at the cutting table at the fabric store asked if I was making a dress.  When I told her I was making a Gryffindor canopy for a Harry Potter bedroom, she stared with her mouth open.  It was the first of many stunned looks directed at my fandom crafting!

Supplies

  • 3 lengths of 1 to 1 1/2” PVC pipe cut into 18” (45.7 cm) pieces (use a hacksaw or have it done at your DIY store)

Note: PVC under 1” is not recommended because it’s too flexible. Make sure the threaded plug & metal flange will work with the pipe you chose. They’re easy to test at the DIY store.

  • 3 threaded plugs
  • 3 metal floor flanges
  • 3 flat PVC caps
  • 3 decorative wood rosette with a flat back
  • Epoxy, Liquid Nails or other cement-like glue
  • Primer spray paint
  • Gold spray paint (Use silver for Slytherin, bronze or silver for Ravenclaw and black for Hufflepuff)
  • Pencil
  • Measuring tape
  • Screwdriver
  • Drill (optional)
  • Screws with anchors
  • 5 1/2 yards (5 meters) of red satiny fabric  (Use green for Slytherin, blue for Ravenclaw or yellow for Huffelpuff)
  • matching thread
  • sewing machine (optional)

Instructions

  1. Prewash fabric then hem on both ends, set aside.
  2. Following manufacturer’s directions, use epoxy to glue the threaded plugs to one end of each of the PVC pipes. On opposite ends of pipes, use epoxy to attach the PVC caps. Epoxy the wooden rosette onto the cap. Allow epoxy to dry. Screw pipe into metal flange. Stand up on it’s end in a well covered, well ventilated area.
  3. Paint with primer. Allow to dry according to manufacturer’s directions. Paint gold. Allow to dry overnight.
  4. Find the center of your bed, mark a light line on the wall. Depending on the width of your bed and where you want the fabric to reach on the sides, you will need to attach the flanges lower or higher.  If you have someone helping you, it’s a good idea to hold the center pipe in place with the fabric, centered, on the pipe. You can then determine how high the center pipe should be and where to place your two side pipes. They can be low or high, depending on your preference.  Use measuring tape to assure the three pipes will be symmetrical.
  5. Attach the metal flanges to the wall using screws and anchors, using the drill for pilot holes if necessary.
  6. Screw pipes into each flange. Arrange canopy fabric.

Makes a great window treatment, too!

Also for your Harry Potter room:  HP Bookcase Mural

p.s. I made the afghan, too.  😉

As always, if you make any pattern or craft from sewhooked,  I’d love to see a photo. Email me or add it to the Friends of sewhooked flickr group.

Happy crafting

also available on The Leaky Cauldron- Crafts

Deco-“paged” Hobbit Wall

Thror's Map, close up

When I was in high school, I read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings for the very first time.

Tolkien’s world wrapped me up and captured me.  I fantasized (and still do!) of taking off for middle earth, walking the road with Bilbo and visiting the elves.

Once a fandom girl, always a fandom girl.

The Hobbit x 16

Part of my Hobbit collection

When my hubby and I bought our home ten years ago, I had already been stockpiling paperback copies of the The Hobbit.   I’ve been collecting interesting Tolkien covers for years and have a lovely collection.  More than one sad, falling-apart copy of The Hobbit came home with me, just to have for that special project I knew I’d be doing some day.

It’s been a good seven or eight years ago that the “The Reading Room” came in to existence.    I still remember the wicked happiness I had knowing that I was permanently attaching words from one of my very favorite stories onto a wall in my house.  Part of it was the joy of Tolkien, and part of it was rebellion at years in rental places with cream colored walls!

When we have new visitors for the first time, and they ask to use our restroom, it’s always with a bit of glee that I direct them to the proper door.  Most people hold on to their calm until they’ve exited the room, but we get the occasional guest that will shout out through the door after they’ve entered.  It’s incredibly striking to stand face to face with a wall that is book pages top to bottom!

And hey, we’ve always got something to read in the bathroom!

Hobbit Decopauge Wall

Decoupaged Wall with pages from two copies of The Hobbit

Note: This is a permanent application. Do not use this technique unless you are absolutely sure you want a permanent change.

Supplies

● books (something you’re willing to recycle  paper back books, maps, picture or comics, newspapers or letters) – amount will vary depending on the size of the wall and the materials used to cover it

Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish or other clear protective finish

● High Quality Paintbrush (check finish container for suggested brush)

● parchment paper

● large piece of cardboard

● masking tape

● newspaper or drop cloth

● latex gloves

● mineral oil

● rags

Instructions

  1. Protect floor, baseboards, etc, with newspaper or drop cloth and masking tape.
  2. Gently remove the book cover (I framed mine and hung them in the same room as the deco wall).
  3. Peel apart the individual pages (this works best with paperback books).
  4. Tape a large piece of parchment paper to the cardboard.
  5. Wearing the latex gloves, put place several book pages on the parchment paper.
  6. Using the paintbrush, cover each with Polycrylic.
  7. Start applying pages to the wall. For a neat effect, line pages up side by side, or overlap and vary (as shown) for a more staggered effect.
  8. “Cut in” by placing pages side by side or slightly overlapping to frame your wall then working your way in.
  9. Use the brush to smooth out any air bubbles. You only have a minute or so to work with each page, so make sure you’re happy with it before moving on.
  10. Allow pages to dry and then apply another coat of Polycrylic over the wall.
  11. Use mineral oil and rags for clean up. Be sure to follow all manufacturer’s safety instructions.

Thror's Map

Thror’s Map, a reproduction that hangs in “The Reading Room”
drawn by Jennifer Ofenstein, 2003
black inck on tea stained paper

As always, if you make any pattern or craft from Sewhooked, share it with the Sewhooked flickr group for a chance to see it posted right here on sewhooked.com!

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also posted on cut out + keep

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Elena’s Knitted Potholder

Elena's Knitted Potholder

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Printable Pattern

One summer, about four years ago, my daughter asked to learn how to knit.

The only hitch in her plan is that I’m not a knitter, so I couldn’t teach her.   That, of course, was her main motivation for wanting to learn.   What better than her knowing a craft I’ve never mastered?

We found a class at a local yarn shop and she learned to knit in just a few hours.  She knitted all summer (she was 10 at the time) and has been knitting ever since.

I knew I was really starting to rub off on her when when one of the first things she did was to write her own pattern.   I just beamed with pride!  My daughter, designing!

I still haven’t learned to knit.  Knitting is her craft and gives her the pride of being able to do something that I can’t.   I find that I am completely okay with that.

I proudly present my daughter, Elena’s, first knitting pattern, unedited and in her own writing.

Buy Wool Felt

elena's pattern

Elena knitting in 2006
Elena knitting in 2006


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Way Back Craft: Harry Potter Bookcase Mural

HP Closet Mural

It’s hard to believe I’ve never blogged about this project!

Years ago, I had a website called Jen’s Crochet and Crafts.   It eventually morphed into sewhooked.   The Harry Potter Bookcase Mural was originally posted there, along with the story of how it came to be.

When my almost-14-year-old-daughter was about to turn 8, she asked for a Harry Potter-themed room for her birthday.   Being a big HP fan myself, I was as excited as she was to take on the project.  Among her requests were castle walls, an enchanted ceiling, The Fat Lady on her door, red and gold hangings for her bed and a magical bookcase.   I managed all of those things, but the bookcase remains my absolute favorite part of the project.

The original bookcase was drawn freehand with chalk.  I’ve since made a map for use on an overhead projector, or, if you have a steady hand and feel up to it, to use as a free-hand guide.

Supplies:

You need a clean dry surface to start with.  If painting on an older surface, you may want to paint with primer first.

Print the template on clear acetate and project the image onto the selected area.   Position the bookcase where you’d like for it to appear. Use masking tape to outline the area that will become your bookcase.

Use semi-gloss paint and the paint roller to paint the taped-off area.

Paint a second coat if necessary. Allow to dry overnight.

Using a pencil or chalk, trace the bookcase (not the contents), adding a border if needed or desired.  A ruler or yardstick comes in really handy for this step.

Paint bookcase shelves and allow to dry.

Starting with the top shelf, trace contents.

Bottom left - close up
bottom left, close up

After tracing, paint contents using a variety of colors.  An egg carton works great to have multiple colors available at once.

Repeat for all shelves, allow to dry overnight.

Using a variety of permanent markers, add book names using this list of books provided.

vBottom right - close up
bottom right, close up

Randomly place books where you like, except for The Standard Book of Spells. Look for these on the second shelf from the top, on the right side.  The seven books are more or less together, each with a line across the top of the binding (only 6 books are listed in the HP series, but I’m assuming there would have been a seventh if Harry had returned for his final year of school).

Top left - close up
top left, close up

Add embellishments; names on potions bottles, cat whiskers, etc. with permanent markers.

Stand back and admire your work!

More photos from the Harry Potter bedroom with instructions on sewhooked

If you make this or any sewhooked crafts, I’d love to see a photo!  Email me or add it to the Friends of sewhooked flickr group.

Happy Crafting!

Also posted on The Leaky Cauldron and cut out + keep

Faux “Knit” Crochet Hogwarts Scarf

Lumos Craft -Scarf In Progress

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Printable Pattern

In July of 2006, I enjoyed one of the best trips of my life to Las Vegas, Nevada.  My friend Hope and I went to Lumos, the first Harry Potter conference I attended.

I was still fairly new to the online Harry Potter fandom, though I’d been part of the HP world since 1999.   I was a new moderator for Harry Potter Crafts (2006-2008) and was not yet working for The Leaky Cauldron as a Crafty Witch (2006-2007).

Lumos changed everything.  Suddenly, the names of people I knew online had faces, and voices and hugs!

Prior to the conference, I went into a crafting frenzy.  I’m a Ravenclaw, and of course needed a house scarf!  I wanted to my scarf to look knit…but I’m not a knitter.  It’s my daughter’s craft, and I have left it alone because it makes her happy to be able to do a craft that mom doesn’t!

Anyhow, I wanted a knit-look scarf and had played with Tunisian crochet before.  After working out the width of the bars, I went to work.  This is the result.  It’s a narrow scarf because I wore it in Las Vegas…in July.  Can you say HOT?

Faux “Knit” Crochet Hogwarts Scarf

Lumos Craft - Ravenclaw Scarf & Prissy

Scarf as modeled in 2006 by my dearly departed Prissy

  • Uses the Tunisian “knit” stitch:  Tutorial on Stitch Diva and on Crochet Cabana (there are lots more, use the one that works for you)
  • Example made in Red Heart worsted weight – Soft Navy & Carrot (for Ravenclaw)
  • “I” afghan or other long crochet hook (gauge varies by size – work with what you like best)

narrow scarf =ch 15, “movie” size=ch 42

Row 1: ch 15 for a narrow scarf, or 42 for wider “movie” size. Insert the hook into the 2nd ch from hook, yo, and pull loop through the chain stitch (2 loops on hook). *Insert hook into next chain, yo, and pull loop through ch*, rep *to* to end of row, leaving all loops on the hook. The number of loops on the the hook should be the same as the beginning foundation chain. Do not turn.

Row 2: Working from left to right, yo and pull through first loop on hook, *yo, and pull through next 2 loops*, rep *to* to end of row (1 loop left on hook).

Row 3: *Insert hook between the 2 double vertical strands of each loop (from front to back), below the chain formed by row 2, yo and pull through a loop (loosely)*, rep *to* across row.

Row 4: Repeat row 2

Repeat row 3 & 4 for pattern. When changing color, attach at end of even row at “1 loop left” so that the remaining loop is the new color. You can easily count the rows you’ve made by the ridges on the back of your work – each ridge equals 2 rows.

*1- 28 in MC 29 (14 ridges)

32 in CC (2 ridges)

33 – 38 in MC (3 ridges)

39-42 in CC (2 ridges)

43- 66 in MC (14 ridges)

Repeat 13 times. You should have 14 sets of “captured” bars and each end should be 28 rows long. Fold the entire scarf in half and whip stitch. The seam can be in the back or on a side – your choice. Whip stitch the ends closed and add short fringe all the way across.

*some resources describe Tunisian crochet with each ridge, or every two rows as one row. If you want to count like that, then think 1-14, 15-16, etc. when counting.

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This is part of my “Way Back Craft” series; patterns, crafts, tutorials and general crafty memories before the days of this craft blog.

This pattern is also available on The Leaky Cauldron.

Candy Cups for Giving


Candy Cup for Christmas

Shared by my aunt, Amy, several years ago, Candy Cups have become a gift-giving standard for me.  I’ve made them for Christmas and birthdays and with all sorts of candy.

They’re easy, inexpensive and make gorgeous gifts for the hard-to-shop for.  Think teachers, friends and anyone that likes candy.  Have a diabetic in your life?  Sugar-free candy works, too!

Once all your supplies are gathered, it’ll take you about an hour to make one candy cup.

You’ll need:

  • Glass or Mug (I prefer clear, but any kind will work, the heavier the better!)
  • Candy with loose or twisted wrappers (example used approximately 40 oz. of peppermints)
  • Styrofoam ball (size depends on your glass or mug)
  • Filler for the cup – recycled paper or candy
  • Bamboo Skewer
  • Scissors
  • Hot Melt Glue
  • Greening Pins (also available at the hobby store with the floral accessories)
  • Ribbon
  • Cellophane

supplies


Push the bamboo skewer into the Styrofoam ball, all the way through the top. Put it in the glass to and push down until the ball is snug in the glass.


Snip off the excess skewer with your scissors.



With the skewer still in the glass, fill the bottom of with candy. Ideas are M&Ms, Hershey Kisses or Peppermints (though you could really use any candy). Another option is shredded paper, but the candy on the ball will make the cup top-heavy, so having a heavier filler keeps it from tipping over and gives the gifted a sweet bonus.



Place a small dot of hot melt glue on either side of the rim of the cup.  Gently press styrofoam ball onto glue, holding in place until it sets.

candies in twisted wrappers

greening pins



Use greening pins to add candy to ball by poking pins through the loose end near the twist of the candy wrapper.  Depending on the candy, you can get two or three on each pin.


Start at the bottom and work up to the top, going in circles.

part of first round


first round complete


first round, from the top



second round done



second round from the top



third round done


third round from the top



Fill in any holes with more candy & greening pins.

Final round complete, all the holes filled in.

Wrap in cellophane and embellish with a bow or ribbon.  The cellophane is optional, but it provides insurance that your candy will get from point “A” to point “B” intact.

Gift it!



Variation with M&Ms and Coca-Cola glasses

Variations by Amy Maxey – toffee coffee & bubble gum soda glass.

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This is part of my “Way Back Craft” series; patterns, crafts, tutorials and general crafty memories before the days of this  blog.

Smiling Santa Gift Bag

Smiling Santa Gift Bag Tutorial

I’ve been making these Santa bags for a lot of years now, but this is the first time I’ve ever shared a how-to for it.

Other similar bags I’ve made include Rudolph, Christmas kitties and Christmas trees.  Change the basic bag to any color and add polka dots or stars for an easy birthday bag!

Smiling Santa is reusable, giftable, and darn cute.  He’s fast to make with simple embroidered stitches and a button nose.    If hand stitching isn’t your thing, fabric paint will work in a pinch!

You’ll need:

  • Smiling Santa reference
  • 9″ x 12″ acrylic felt – 2 white, 1 red, 1 flesh
  • scissors
  • large needle
  • embroidery floss:  white, red, blue & green
  • red button
  • ruler
  • optional:  sewing machine
  • optional:  rotary cutter

supplies


I use eco-friendly acrylic felt.  It’s easy to find, cheap (20 cents a sheet) and sturdy.


Find the bottom of your bag and cut 1″ squares out of the opposite corners for each white sheet. This will create a faux gusset and allow your gift bag to stand up.


Cut the flesh-colored felt sheet down to 8″ x 5 1/2″.  Fold in half and cut a gentle curve.

Smiling Santa Gift Bag Tutorial

Open flesh-colored felt.  Align 1″ from top of bag, centering so that each side has approximately 1/2″ of white felt showing.


Using the white embroidery floss, hand stitch a running stitch around the two sides and bottom of the face.



Add eye details with a straight stitch (eyebrows) and chain stitch (eyes).


Add button nose with red embroidery floss.  Add mouth, also with red embroidery floss, using the chain stitch.


Pin two pieces of white felt together, face inside.  Machine stitch 1/4″ seam on two sides and across the bottom.

Optional:  hand stitch on the inside OR hand stitch on the outside using red embroidery floss.


Fold the open corners on the bottom together, matching outside seams.  Fold seams in opposite directions to reduce bulk.  Pin in place.



Machine stitch bag corners.


Turn bag right side out.


Fold 1″ down on top of bag, overlapping face.  Pin, then straight stitch around.  Stitch under side seam.



Finished stitching on the top of bag.


Cut two 12″ x 2″ strips from red felt.


Fold straps lengthwise.  Straight stitch along the length with green embroidery floss.


Pin handle to outside of bag 2″ in from the sides.



Straight stitch snowflake or asterisk to hold handles in place.  Repeat for the back of bag.


Stuff with goodies and gift it!

Christmas tree gift bag

Feeling creative? Try your hand at a Christmas Tree!


fun variations, Dec. 2000

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This is part of my “Way Back Craft” series; patterns, crafts, tutorials and general crafty memories before the days of this craft blog.

Crochet Granny Handbag

crochet bag

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Printable Pattern

From the Way Back Vault today, I have one of my old fabvorites.

The Crochet Granny Handbag dates back to September 29, 2003.

I don’t remember who received the original, but I’ve made several as gifts since then.  It’s a quick and easy pattern and makes a sturdy little bag, especially when it includes the optional lining.

 

You’ll need

  • Small amount of 2 Worsted colors (listed as A & B). Shown are Red Heart Country Blue (A) and Windsor Blue (B).
  • I Hook
  • for optional lining:  fabric, needle, thread, zipper
  • scissors
  • tapestry/yarn needle

(Note – all stitches after the first round are in the back loops except on the corners, when you crochet over the chain.)

Front/Back (make 2)

Round 1 – With Color A, ch 4, join with sl st. Ch 3 2 dc, ch 2 in ring. (3 dc, ch 2) 3 times, sl st into starting ch 3. Do not turn.

Round 2 – Ch 3, dc in BACK LOOPS to corner ch 2 sp (2 dc, ch 2 2dc in corner sp, dc in back loops across), rep to beg ch 3, join with sl st. Break off Color A. Do not turn.

Round 3 – Join Color B in any ch 2 sp. Ch 3, dc, ch 2, 2 dc, (dc in back loops across, 2 dc, ch 2 2 dc in corner sp) around, join with sl st in beg ch 3.

Round 4 – Join Color A, rep pattern of round 3.

crochet bag

A close up of the strap side, using single crochet to join.

Strap

Ch 120, hdc in 3rd ch from hook, hdc in each chain to end, finish off. Starting in the center stitch on one front/back square, join strap by sc through the back loops only of the strap and the square. Sc in first 25 st to join strap, continue sc st in back loop of front/back square across top of bag. Sc in last 25 st of strap from the 2nd ch in the corner of the square back to where you joined. Join with sl st. Sl st ends of strap then around to back loop on opposite side of strap, crochet around same as for opposite side.

Lining (optional)

For a sturdier bag, line with a scrap of coordinating (shown) or contrasting fabric of the same size. Hand-stitch inside the bag below the sc round (round 4).

To add a zipper, sew it to the lining before you stitch the lining in the bag, then stitch whip-stitch on the lining seam to inside of round 4.

Other Options

For a longer strap, or bigger bag, simply add stitches or rounds to suit your needs, taking into account how many stitches you will need to get the strap all the way around the bag. For more depth, make the strap two or even three rows wide before attaching to the granny squares.

As always, if you make any pattern or craft from sewhooked,  I’d love to see a photo. Email me or add it to the Friends of sewhooked flickr group.

Happy crafting

This is part of my “Way Back Craft” series; patterns, crafts, tutorials and general crafty memories before the days of this craft blog.

Easy Big Foot Slippers

Easy Big Feet Slippers

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Printable Pattern

My hubby is tall…very tall, almost six and a half feet tall.  I adoringly refer to him as The Big Guy.  I’m 5’5″, so I guess you can see what I’d call him that.

He has big feet, too.

He loves slippers and I spent years making slippers from traditional patterns for him, but they blew out on him like no one’s business.  You just can’t put a big man in a pair of slippers made with one strand of yarn.  They don’t last.

According to my original pattern, I designed the Big Foot Slippers back in 2000.  I’ve since made a dozen or so pairs, altering here and there for smaller feet.  These are easy to make and work up quickly because they’re made with three strands of yarn.  I use acrylic worsted because it’s easy to wash and holds up well to the wear and tear of a big man wearing slippers!

  • 3 colors of worsted weight acrylic yarn
  • “N” hook
  • yarn needle

Three yarns are held together throughout.

Round 1 – ch 6, join with sl st into ring, ch 3, 14 dc in ring

Round 2 – ch 3, 1 dc in join (1 dc, 2 dc around), join with sl st

Round 3 to 8 – ch 3, dc around, join with sl st

Round 9 to 14 – ch 3, dc around, don’t join, ch 3 turn (except last round). Note – You can add more or less rows here, depending on the size of the foot you’re crocheting for. To finish, whip stitch up the back using the outside loops only. Finish off.

Optional: Evenly sc around the slipper opening, join with a sl st, finish off.

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Crochet Hogwarts Hat & Scarf for a Plushie

At some time during 2005 or 2006 during a frenzied Harry Potter craft session which happened to coincide with the height of my children’s Build-A-Bear obsession, the thought occurred to me that my daughter’s lion needed to be, no must be, a Gryffindor.

Fun, fast and free crochet at it’s geeky best!

Plushie Gryffindor Hat & Scarf

add this pattern to your ravelry queue:

Printable Pattern

Supplies:
2 colors worsted yarns (Red Heart used in example)
N – hook

Hat:
Crocheted with two strands of each yarn throughout.
Row 1 – with burgundy, ch 6. Sl st in first ch to form ring. Ch 3, 11 DC over ring, sl st to join. Finish off.
Row 2 – join gold to in any st, ch 3, DC in same st, 2 DC in each st around. Sl st to join. Finish off.
Row 3 – join burgundy in any st, ch 3, DC in next st and each st around. Finish off.
Row 4 – join gold in any st, ch 3, DC in next st, ch 3, sk 3 dc, dc in next 8 sts, ch 3, sk 3 st, dc in remaining sts. Finish off.
Row 5 – join burgundy in any st, sc in each st around, sc over ch 3s. Finish off, weave in ends.

Attach Pom-Pom (optional)

Scarf:
Crocheted with two strands of each yarn throughout.
ch 5
Row 1 – sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc across. Ch 1 turn.
Row 2 – sc across, ch 1 turn
Row 3 – sc across. Attach new color at top of last st. Ch 1, turn

Repeat 1-3 in alternating colors for a total of 13 blocks of color. Add fringe.

Ravenclaw Kitty

Ravenclaw Kitty

This pattern also available on The Leaky Cauldron

Happy Crafting!