Tag Archives: thrift store

TTMT #526 – Quilt Seeds

signature-2016

Sewhooked Pattern Shop

My Quilty Facebook ♥ Sewhooked on FB

Sewhooked Facebook Group

Instagram

Posts on this blog may contain affiliate links. Thank you for your support. ♥

Advertisements

TTMT #525 – This, That, Cat.

I realized after recording that I didn’t at all mention what dishcloth pattern I use. This is my go to, it’s easy peasy and they hold up really well!

My Super Simple Crochet Dishcloth

  • I Hook, cotton yarn
  • Ch 21 (loosely), sc in second ch from hook, dc in next. *sc in next, dc in next* to end. Ch-1, turn.
  • Repeat Until Square – sc in first st, dc in second, *sc in next, dc in next* to end. Ch 1, turn.
  • Optional – sc around evenly, 2 sc in each corner. Finish off.

Linky Links!

signature-2016

Sewhooked Pattern Shop

My Quilty Facebook ♥ Sewhooked on FB

Sewhooked Facebook Group

Instagram

Posts on this blog may contain affiliate links. Thank you for your support. ♥

Upcycled Light Fixture

How many Ofensteins does it take to change a light bulb?

In this case, two.

So, we had this light fixture. It was a super-cheap, builder installed glass globe. The problem was, the light hangs on a chain in our stairwell. The glass globe, attached to the fixture by screws. It takes a broom handle with a hook attached to the end just to reach it. It takes one person to hold it with the broom while the other gingerly removes the globe, swaps the bulb and then replaces the globe. All of this while trying desperately to not drop any of the breakable pieces to the concrete of the first floor below.

In short, changing the light bulb…pain in the rear end. And the thing was not even pretty.

Some time ago, I found a fabulous silk (or silk-like) lampshade at a thrift store. It cost $2. The shade was meant to be on a floor lamp, but I really wanted to use it in the stairwell. The problem was, I could never quite figure out how, so for over a year, it hung from a hook in my bedroom ceiling.

Then the stairwell light bulb went out.

The hubby and I went to work as described above. 15 minutes into the painful act of changing the stairwell light bulb, with two dropped screws and a lot of swearing, we took  a break before putting the glass globe back on.

Then, epiphany. I finally figured out how to attach the shade to the fixture.

Upcycled Light Fixture

I used a small hole punch and made evenly spaced holes around the top of the shade. Into these, I attached short chain I made out of split rings, and then to that, S-hooks. The S-hooks went into the base of the original fixture where the glass globe was attached by screws.

Upcycled Light Fixture
Wallah! A thing of beauty…and no breakable parts.

Photobucket

SEWHOOKED SHOP |SCHEDULESEWHOOKED FB
JEN FACEBOOK | TWITTER | FLICKR GROUP

Sewing: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle a Thrift Store Sweater


The Recycled Sweater Bag isn’t quite old enough to be considered a Way Back Craft.  I first started making this bag last year.  It works great with a felted thrift store sweater, but you can also make this bag out of denim, upholstery fabric, or just about any other heavy duty material.

Do I need a reason to make a new bag?  Not really, but recycling is a darn good incentive!

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle a Thrift Store Sweater
© Jennifer Ofenstein
http://www.sewhooked.org

You will need:


  • 1 old or thift store wool sweater – felted
  • fabric for lining & pockets
  • magnet purse snap
  • 2 buttons
  • sewing machine
  • thread
  • scissors
  • chalk
  • pins
  • rotary cutter (optional)
  • walking foot (optional)




Cut a square or rectangle out of the body of the sweater, cut the same dimensions from lining fabric, remove sweater armss.




Split sleeves up seam and cut off the tops for pockets.




Cut rectangles out of the sleeve tops, cut same dimensions +1.5″ in length for lining.




Using the remaining scraps, cut out 2 circles and trim circles into free form flowers.




Cut 2″ squares out of the bottom left and right, repeat for lining fabric.


Create a long tube from lining fabric for inside pockets, pin pockets to inside, mark center with chalk for stitching line.




Pin sides and bottom, stitch, leave 2″ corners open, leave opening in the side or bottom for turning.




Fold 2” cut out matching side and bottom seams.


The bottom and pockets should look like this.




Add magnetic snaps following package directions. Leave enough seam allowance at the top for stitching recommend 1″ or more, using a folded piece of scrap fabric to reinforce the snap. Stitch around snap to reinforce extra fabric.




Pin sweater pocket to lining, right sides together (lining should be 1.5″ longer), stitch ends.




Line up bottom of pocket, pin, then stitch sides. Leave an opening for turning.


Trim corners, turn pocket and pin openings.




Stitch side seams of bag, leaving bottom open.


Pin pockets over side seams (right side), then stitch to attach.




Stitch across bottom.




Fold 2″ cut out, matching side & bottom seams, pin & stitch.




The inside bottom should look like this.




Trim sleeves to desired width for strap – 5″ or 6″ recommended.




Pin ends of two sleeves together, stitch and trim seam.




Fold lengthwise, stitch, leaving approx. 6″ open for turning


Turn right side out and smooth opening.




Stitch closed with a tight whip stitch.




Pin strap to side seams, matching right sides, stitch.




Making sure the straps are inside, pin lining to outside, right sides together, stitch.




Turn bag right side out, through opening in the lining.




Pin opening in lining and stitch.




Turn lining inside, smooth and pin, top stitch ¼”.




Stitch flower to center of each side over snap, stitch button on top.


Done!


variation from a purple sweater

If you make this or any sewhooked crafts, I’d love to see a photo!  Email me or add it to the Friends of sewhooked flickr group.

Happy Crafting!

also posted on cut out + keep and YouTube

Reconstruction: Pockety Hoody

sweatshirt update

I’m a big thrift store shopper.  Sometimes, I find great articles of clothing that are the perfect size for one of my kids, but I know they won’t wear it because of a design or picture that’s on it.   They’re both really into black at the moment and I found a great black hoodie sweatshirt the perfect size for my son.  The price?  $1.25.  Could I pass that by?  NO WAY.

The drawback?  It came with an embroidered image of The Grinch.  Cute, yes, his style, absolutely not!

After having the sweatshirt linger in my “to do something with” pile for a while, it occurred to me that I have all kinds of odds and ends leftover from other projects that might update the shirt and make it ready to wear.

One Levi’s pocket and about ten minutes of stitching later, and the update is complete and the hoody has gone from “Absolutely not!” to “Cool, Mom!”

It’s more of an update than reconstruction, but you get the idea!

To update a logo sweatshirt, you’ll need the sweatshirt and one jean’s pocket.  Use a heavy-duty seam ripper to remove the pocket, or, if you feel comfortable doing so, a razor blade.  Just be careful if you do!

A sewing machine is pretty much a must for this project, but if you want to try it by hand, you’ll need a heavy duty needle and a bit of patience to sew through all the layers!

sweatshirt update

Smooth out your sweatshirt.

sweatshirt update

Remove jeans pocket, being careful not to tear the fabric or cut yourself.

sweatshirt update

Pin the pocket in place.  You can go for a straight angle like I did here, or turn it a bit left or right for a more interesting look.

sweatshirt update

From the front, stitch carefully around the pocket using the existing stitching lines.  Reinforce at the corners and top of the seams.

sweatshirt update

And you’re done!  Super fast and easy update!

As always, if you make any pattern or craft from sewhooked,  I’d love to see a photo. Email me or add it to the Friends of Sewhooked flickr group.

Happy crafting